Yoga at Macadamia Lodge -The Beginning

Monday, 31 October 2011 05:34
As we all know, yoga helps to keep you flexible; it teaches you to accept and move with change; it encourages you both in daily living, as well as in a focused yoga class practice, to let go of all expectation of outcome and just stay in the present moment – you might think you know how things are going to turn out but more often than not, it's not quite what you expected it would be; it helps to develop a calm and balanced outlook so that when life's little hiccups come your way you're able to remain detached, to acknowledge, accept and let go of the negative and to keep with the positive.
 
In the past year I would say I have been truly tried and tested as a yoga teacher at Macadamia Lodge. When the first 3 would-be students asked if I would teach a once weekly yoga class, I hastily scrambled around for a space and we ended up in, what is now, the kitchenette/lounge area of one of our guest cottages. Despite a relentless and dazzling setting sun in our eyes through the West facing glass door on most evenings, we managed a few weeks' of classes before we were booted out by the builders who had come to do a conversion job. Undeterred and as other students joined the class, we carried our mats to the front terrace of the house and prayed for temporary peace and quiet from understanding family members and family pets who thought Downward Facing Dog pose was just for them as we went about our Triangles and Warriors.
 
The setting sun was still splendidly in our eyes so a hastily constructed curtain wire and flapping Indian print textile was strung up over the balustrade. One evening more students than the terrace could handle arrived and so we all decamped to the lawn under the mango tree which was very fine, until the Zulu wind started to gust through the trees and across the grass, blowing sandy soil and leaves into our faces and threatening to turn our yoga mats into flying carpets. Back once more to the terrace as the risen student numbers fell again (obviously not the outdoor types), we faced rainstorms, thunder and lightning, gales, moths, dive bombing swallows returning to their nests in the eaves at dusk and emerging bats as day turned into night. Occasional power failures made some classes quite gloomy affairs whilst yoga by candlelight sessions were frequently scuppered by inclement weather conditions.
 
Yoga teachers though are nothing if not flexible in the face of change and in those times of need, if there was an empty room anywhere at all, it was commandeered at the 11th hour, festooned with flowers and candles, chakra wall hangings and incense sticks and used for a yoga class. My students quickly came to accept the unexpected and remained unfazed even when tramping across the garden by torchlight to yet another yoga space. Winter found us all in the spare bedroom where we've managed to stay in semi-permanence for the past few months. It was in this room that 3 little people 5 years old and under had their first taste of being trees, crocodiles and bridges as they practiced morning yoga with yogi grandma. It was here that my first Yoga from a Chair session was put together in preparation for a presentation and practice with senior members of the community and it was here that the idea for a final resting place for a permanent yoga space was conceived.
 
The dream is about to come true. Macadamia Lodge's peripatetic yoga teacher is about to find her roots. Finally, after all these months the 'Yoga Hut' is nearly ready to open its sliding door. We will face East with a superb view over towards the sand dunes and the coast, so in future we will greet the sun rather than bid it goodnight. We look forward to continuing regular weekly classes with existing students who have enjoyed their moving yoga over the past months as well as new students who would like to join us. We will welcome into our classes guests staying at the lodge. Macadamia Lodge also welcomes visiting yoga teachers and their students to come and use our space for their own classes.